Workplace Injuries and Illnesses in 1993

TEXT
Table 1. Nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates per
Table 2.  Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses, by industry d
ivision, 1993
Table 3.  Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worker
s 1,  by industry division
Table 4.  Occupational injury and illness incidence rates per 100 full-time wor
kers, (1) 1973-93. 2
Table 5. Occupational injury and illness incidence rates per 100 full-time work
ers 1, by industry division, 1991-93
Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worke
rs (1), by industry, 1993
Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worke
rs (1), by industry, 1993 - Continued
Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worke
rs (1), by industry, 1993 - Continued
Table 7.  Nonfatal occupational injuries:  number of cases and incidence rates,

 
USDL-94-600
 
 
Technical information:
E. Jackson (202) 606-6180
Media contact:
FOR RELEASE:  10 A.M. EST
K. Hoyle (202) 606-5902
Wednesday, December 21, 1994
 
WORKPLACE INJURIES AND ILLNESSES IN 1993
 
   A total of 6.7 million injuries and illnesses was reported in
private industry workplaces during 1993, resulting in a rate of 8.5
cases for every 100 equivalent full-time workers.   The rate varied
by industry, ranging from 12 injuries and illnesses for every 100
full-time construction workers to 3 per 100 full-time workers in
finance, insurance, and real  estate, according to initial results
from the latest annual survey of job-related injuries and
illnesses by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of
Labor.
 
   The 1993 findings announced today are the second in a series of
three annual releases  from the BLS safety and health statistical
system.  In August 1994, the first release  covered work-related
fatalities from the 1993 National Census of Fatal Occupational
Injuries.  In April 1995, a third release will contain information
on the characteristics of  workers sustaining serious nonfatal
injuries and illnesses in 1993, for example, their occupation, the
nature of their injury or illness, and how it happened.
 
   The annual survey provides estimates of the number and frequency
(incidence rates) of  workplace injuries and illnesses based on
logs kept by private industry employers during the year.  These
records reflect not only the year's injury and illness experience
but also the employer's understanding of which cases are work
related under current recordkeeping guidelines of the U.S.
Department of Labor.  The number of injuries and illnesses reported
in any given year also can be influenced by changes in the level of
economic activity, working conditions and work practices, worker
experience and training, and the number of hours worked.
 
   After increasing in 1991-92, the incidence rate of reported
injuries and illnesses fell from 8.9 per 100 full-time workers in
1992 to 8.5 cases per 100 workers in 1993.  Since 1980, such rates
have fluctuated within a broad range of 7.5 to 9.0.
 
1993 Results
 
   Of the 6.7 million nonfatal injuries and illnesses, nearly 6.3
million were injuries that resulted in lost worktime, medical
treatment other than first aid, loss of consciousness,
 
                               - 2 -
 
restriction of work or motion, or transfer to another job.  The
remainder of these private industry cases (about 482,000) were
work-related illnesses.
 
  Other findings on 1993 nonfatal injuries and illnesses follow:
 
        *  Nearly 3 million injuries and illnesses were serious
           enough to require recuperation away from work, to
          restrict duties at work, or both (table 2).
 
        *  Manufacturing accounted for about three-fifths of
           all newly reported occupational illnesses (table 2).
           About three-fifths of the workplace illnesses were
           disorders associated with repeated trauma (302,000),
           such as carpal tunnel syndrome.  (See "Background of
           the Survey" for limitations on kinds of illnesses
           reported.)
 
        *  Injury rates were higher for mid-size establishments
           (with 50 to 499 workers) than for the smallest and
           the largest groupings (table 3).  This pattern
           varied somewhat by industry division.
 
        *  Both the 1991-92 increase and the 1992-93 decline in
           injury and illness rates largely reflected changes
           in the number of cases that did not involve lost work-
           time or restricted work activity (table 4).
 
        *  The lost worktime rates for workers in mining and
           transportation industries continued to be higher than
           the non-lost worktime rates (table 5).
 
        *   Injury rates can vary widely among individual
            industries sharing the same broad industrial
            activity.  Rates in manufacturing, for example,
            ranged from about 16 per 100 full-time workers in
           primary metal industries to about 4 per 100
           workers in instruments and related products
           industries (table 6).
 
        *   Nine industries, each having at least 100,000
            injuries, accounted for about 1.9 million injuries,
            or 30 percent of the 6.3 million total (table 7).
 
Background of the Survey
 
   The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses is a
Federal/State program (50/50 funded) in which employer reports are
collected from about 250,000 private industry establishments and
processed by State agencies cooperating with the Bureau of Labor
 
 
                               - 3 -
 
 
Statistics.  Occupational injury and illness data for coal, metal,
and nonmetal mining and for railroad activities were provided by
the Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration and
the Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration.
The survey measures nonfatal injuries and illnesses only.  The
survey also excludes the self-employed; farmers with fewer than
11 employees; private households; and employees in federal, state,
and local government agencies.
 
   In addition to the summary injury and illness data presented in
this release, the BLS survey will provide details on the more
seriously injured and ill workers (occupations, age, gender, race,
and length of service) and on the circumstances of their injuries
and illnesses (nature of the injury/illness, part of body affected,
event or exposure, and primary and secondary sources of the
injury/illness).  "More seriously" is defined in this survey as
involving days away from work.  This more detailed information is
scheduled for release in April 1995.
 
   The survey continues to measure the number of new work-related
illness cases which are recognized, diagnosed, and reported during
the year.  Some conditions, e.g., long-term latent illnesses caused
by exposure to carcinogens, often are difficult to relate to the
workplace and are not adequately recognized and reported.  These
long-term latent illnesses are believed to be understated in the
survey's illness measures.  In contrast, the overwhelming majority
of the reported new illnesses are those which are easier to
directly relate to workplace activity (e.g., contact dermatitis or
carpal tunnel syndrome).
 
   The survey estimates of occupational injuries and illnesses are
based on a scientifically  selected probability sample, rather than
a census of the entire population.  These sample- based estimates
may differ from the results which would be obtained from a census
of the population.  The sample used was one of many possible
samples, each of which could have produced different estimates.
The variation in the sample estimates across all possible samples
that could have been drawn is measured by the standard error.  For
example, the 1993 incidence rate for all occupational injuries and
illnesses of 8.5 per 100 full-time workers in private industry has
an estimated relative standard error of about 0.4 percent or less
than 0.1 percentage point.  A relative standard error was
calculated for each estimate from the survey and will be published
in a BLS bulletin that will be available in the summer of 1995.
 
   The data also are subject to nonsampling error.  The inability
to obtain information about all cases in the sample, mistakes in
recording or coding the data, and definitional difficulties are
examples of nonsampling error in the survey.  Nonsampling errors
are not measured.  However, BLS has implemented quality assurance
procedures to minimize nonsampling error in the survey.
 
                                - 4 -
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------
 Note on Injury and Illness Severity
 
   From 1972-91, BLS generated limited measures of severity for
 lost workday injuries and illnesses.  These included the total
 number of lost workdays and the lost workdays incidence rate per
 100 full-time workers.  Although employer reports include a
 prediction of future lost worktime for injured and ill workers who
 have not returned to regular work activity by the end of the
 survey year, BLS is unable to verify the accuracy of these
 estimates.
 
   As an alternative measure of injury and illness severity,
 beginning with the 1992 data, BLS began to estimate the percent
 distribution and median number of lost workdays by industry and
 for groups of workers sustaining similar work disabilities, for
 example, back injuries.  Information of this type for 1993 will be
 available in an April 1995 news release by industry division,
 worker demographics, and characteristics of the days away from
 work cases.
 
   To allow users a one-year transition to these new measures, the
 total number of lost workdays and lost workdays incidence rates
 were produced for 1992 data.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Table 1. Nonfatal occupational injury and illness incidence rates per
100 full-time workers 1, by industry division, 1993
_______________________________________________________________________________
___________________________
 
                                                           Lost workday cases
                                                    ___________________________
________
                                                                               
               Cases
        Industry division                Total                                 
           without lost
                                         cases                              Wit
h            workdays
                                                          Total 2         days 
away
                                                                         from w
ork 3
_______________________________________________________________________________
__________________________
 
 
 
      Private industry 4..........         8.5               3.8              2
.9               4.8
 
Agriculture, forestry, and fishing
   4..............................        11.2               5.0              4
.2               6.2
Mining 5..........................         6.8               3.9              3
.3               2.9
Construction......................        12.2               5.5              4
.9               6.7
Manufacturing.....................        12.1               5.3              3
.3               6.8
   Durable goods..................        13.1               5.4              3
.5               7.7
   Nondurable goods...............        10.7               5.0              3
.0               5.7
Transportation and public
   utilities 5....................         9.5               5.4              4
.3               4.1
Wholesale and retail trade........         8.1               3.4              2
.8               4.7
   Wholesale trade................         7.8               3.7              2
.8               4.1
   Retail trade...................         8.2               3.3              2
.7               4.9
Finance, insurance, and real
   estate.........................         2.9               1.2              1
.0               1.7
Services..........................         6.7               2.8              2
.3               3.9
 
_______________________________________________________________________________
__________________________
 
  1 The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 
full-time workers and were
calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000, where
 
          N        = number of injuries and illnesses
          EH       = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar ye
ar
          200,000  = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hour
s per week, 50 weeks per year).
 
  2 Total includes cases involving restricted work activity only in addition to
 days-away-from-work cases
with or without restricted work activity.
  3 Days-away-from-work cases include those which result in days away from work
 with or without restricted
work activity.
  4 Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
  5 Data conforming to OSHA definitions for mining operators in coal,      meta
l, and nonmetal mining and
for employers in railroad transportation are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety
 and Health Administration,
U.S. Department of Labor; and the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Departm
ent of Transportation.
Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal 
mining industries.
 
NOTE:  Because of rounding, components may not add to the totals.
 
 Table 2.  Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses, by industry 
division, 1993
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________
 
                                                    Lost workday cases
                                                    ___________________________
_________       Cases
                                         Total                                 
            without lost
        Industry division                cases                               Wi
th            workdays
                                        (000's)          Total (1)         days
 away          (000's)
                                                          (000's)        from w
ork (2)
                                                                            (00
0's)
_______________________________________________________________________________
___________________________
 
      INJURIES AND ILLNESSES
 
 
        Private industry (3)......       6,737.4           2,967.4           2,
252.5           3,770.0
 
  Agriculture, forestry, and
     fishing (3)..................         118.8              52.8             
 44.8              66.0
  Mining (4)......................          42.9              24.9             
 21.1              18.0
  Construction....................         510.5             229.9             
204.8             280.6
  Manufacturing...................       2,168.7             943.3             
583.8           1,225.4
     Durable goods................       1,343.5             556.1             
352.9             787.4
     Nondurable goods.............         825.2             387.2             
230.9             438.0
  Transportation and public
     utilities (4)................         518.5             293.0             
233.0             225.5
  Wholesale and retail trade......       1,670.7             706.7             
569.5             963.9
     Wholesale trade..............         448.1             211.4             
160.9             236.7
     Retail trade.................       1,222.6             495.3             
408.6             727.3
  Finance, insurance, and real
     estate.......................         173.5              71.1             
 60.2             102.4
  Services........................       1,533.8             645.6             
535.4             888.2
 
             INJURIES
 
        Private industry (3)......       6,255.3           2,772.5           2,
135.6           3,482.9
 
  Agriculture, forestry, and
     fishing (3)..................         113.1              51.2             
 43.5              61.9
  Mining (4)......................          41.2              24.2             
 20.5              17.0
  Construction....................         501.8             226.5             
201.6             275.3
  Manufacturing...................       1,869.1             819.5             
526.6           1,049.6
     Durable goods................       1,168.8             489.9             
319.8             678.9
     Nondurable goods.............         700.3             329.6             
206.7             370.7
  Transportation and public
     utilities (4)................         497.8             284.1             
225.4             213.7
  Wholesale and retail trade......       1,621.6             685.7             
553.1             935.9
     Wholesale trade..............         431.5             205.3             
156.4             226.1
     Retail trade.................       1,190.1             480.4             
396.7             709.8
  Finance, insurance, and real
     estate.......................         152.4              61.7             
 52.2              90.7
  Services........................       1,458.3             619.6             
512.7             838.8
 
            ILLNESSES
 
        Private industry (3)......         482.1             194.9             
116.9             287.1
 
  Agriculture, forestry, and
     fishing (3)..................           5.8               1.6             
  1.3               4.1
  Mining (4)......................           1.7               0.6             
  0.6               1.0
  Construction....................           8.7               3.4             
  3.1               5.3
  Manufacturing...................         299.6             123.8             
 57.3             175.8
     Durable goods................         174.7              66.2             
 33.1             108.5
     Nondurable goods.............         124.8              57.6             
 24.2              67.2
  Transportation and public
     utilities (4)................          20.7               9.0             
  7.6              11.8
  Wholesale and retail trade......          49.1              21.0             
 16.4              28.0
     Wholesale trade..............          16.6               6.1             
  4.5              10.5
     Retail trade.................          32.5              14.9             
 11.9              17.5
  Finance, insurance, and real
     estate.......................          21.1               9.4             
  8.0              11.6
  Services........................          75.5              26.0             
 22.7              49.4?_______________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
 
       1 Total includes cases involving restricted work activity only in additi
on to  days-away-from-work
cases with or without restricted work activity.
       2 Days-away-from-work cases include those which result in days away from
 work with or without
restricted work activity.
       3 Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
       4 Data conforming to OSHA definitions for mining operators in coal, meta
l, and nonmetal mining and
for employers in railroad transportation are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety
 and Health Administration,
U.S. Department of Labor; and the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Departm
ent of Transportation.
Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal 
mining industries.
 
       NOTE:  Because of rounding, components may not add to the totals.
 Table 3.  Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worke
rs 1,  by industry division
and employment size, 1993
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________
                                                    Establishment employment si
ze (workers)
                                      _________________________________________
_______________________________
          Industry division
                                          1        20       50       100      2
50      500     1,000    2,500
                                          to       to       to       to       t
o       to       to       or
                                          19       49       99       249      4
99      999     2,499    more
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________
 
 
          Private industry 2..........     4.3      7.8      9.8     10.5      
9.3      8.5      8.1      8.1
 
  Agriculture, forestry, and fishing 2     9.3     10.5     12.0     12.7     1
1.5      8.8       -        -
 
  Mining 3............................     6.3      8.3      7.7      7.4      
5.2      4.7       -        -
 
  Construction........................     9.7     14.4     15.0     13.6     1
1.5      7.7      4.2      2.5
 
  Manufacturing.......................     7.0     11.1     12.9     12.1     1
0.4      8.9      9.1      9.9
 
     Durable goods....................     8.7     12.9     14.5     13.6     1
1.1      9.0      9.4     10.9
 
     Nondurable goods.................     4.4      8.5     11.0     10.5      
9.8      8.7      8.7      5.7
 
  Transportation and public utilities
     3................................     5.1      9.8     11.6     10.7      
7.8      9.6      8.8      9.6
 
  Wholesale and retail trade..........     4.0      8.1      9.7     10.9     1
1.2      9.8      9.1      9.3
 
      Wholesale trade.................     4.4      8.1      9.3     10.4      
9.6      8.8      7.7      1.8
 
      Retail trade....................     3.9      8.1      9.9     11.1     1
1.9     10.1      9.5      9.5
 
  Finance, insurance, and real estate.     2.1      3.0      2.9      3.1      
3.0      2.4      2.1      1.5
 
  Services............................     2.7      4.3      7.8      9.7      
8.4      9.0      8.4      7.4
______________________________________________________________________  1 The i
ncidence rates represent the number of injuries per 100 full-time workers and w
ere calculated as:
N/EH) X 200,000, where
 
        N        =  number of injuries
        EH       =  total hours worked by all employees during the calendar yea
r
        200,000  =  base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours
 per week, 50 weeks per
                    year).
  2 Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
  3 Data conforming to OSHA definitions for mining operators in coal,
metal, and nonmetal mining and for employers in railroad transportation
are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S.
Department of Labor; and the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S.
Department of Transportation.  Independent mining contractors are excluded
from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries.
 
  - Data not available.
 Table 4.  Occupational injury and illness incidence rates per 100 full-time wo
rkers, (1) 1973-93. 2
_______________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________
 
                                Injuries and illnesses                         
             Injuries
                    ___________________________________________             ___
________________________________________
 
 
                                  Lost workday cases                           
      Lost workday cases
                               ______________________                          
   _______________________
        Year                                            Cases                  
                              Cases
                       Total                           without           Total 
                             without
                       cases                  With       lost            cases 
                 With          lost
                                 Total 3   days away   workdays                
    Total 3   days away      workdays
                                          from work 4                          
             from work 4
_______________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________
 
1973................     11.0        3.4         -         7.5             10.6
        3.3         -           7.3
1974................     10.4        3.5         -         6.9             10.0
        3.4         -           6.6
1975................      9.1        3.3        3.2        5.8              8.8
        3.2        3.1          5.6
1976................      9.2        3.5        3.3        5.7              8.9
        3.4        3.2          5.5
1977................      9.3        3.8        3.6        5.5              9.0
        3.7        3.5          5.3
1978 5..............      9.4        4.1        3.8        5.3              9.2
        4.0        3.7          5.2
1979 5..............      9.5        4.3        4.0        5.2              9.2
        4.2        3.9          5.0
1980................      8.7        4.0        3.7        4.7              8.5
        3.9        3.6          4.6
1981................      8.3        3.8        3.5        4.5              8.1
        3.7        3.4          4.4
1982................      7.7        3.5        3.2        4.2              7.6
        3.4        3.2          4.1
1983 5..............      7.6        3.4        3.2        4.2              7.5
        3.4        3.1          4.1
1984 5..............      8.0        3.7        3.4        4.3              7.8
        3.6        3.3          4.2
1985................      7.9        3.6        3.3        4.3              7.7
        3.6        3.3          4.2
1986................      7.9        3.6        3.3        4.3              7.7
        3.6        3.3          4.2
1987................      8.3        3.8        3.4        4.4              8.0
        3.7        3.3          4.3
1988................      8.6        4.0        3.5        4.6              8.3
        3.8        3.4          4.4
1989................      8.6        4.0        3.4        4.6              8.2
        3.9        3.3          4.4
1990................      8.8        4.1        3.4        4.7              8.3
        3.9        3.3          4.5
1991................      8.4        3.9        3.2        4.5              7.9
        3.7        3.1          4.2
1992 6..............      8.9        3.9        3.0        5.0              8.3
        3.6        2.9          4.7
1993 6..............      8.5        3.8        2.9        4.8              7.9
        3.5        2.7          4.4
_______________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________
 
  1 The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 
full-time workers and were calculated
as: (N/EH) x 200,000, where
 
          N        = number of injuries and illnesses
          EH       = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar ye
ar
          200,000  = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hour
s per week, 50 weeks per year).
 
  2 Data for 1973-1975 are based on the Standard Industrial Classification Manu
al, 1967 Edition; data for 1976-1987
are based on the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1972 Edition; and d
ata for 1988-93 are based on the
Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987 Edition.
  3 Total includes cases involving restricted work activity only in addition to
 days-away-from-work cases with or
without restricted work activity.
  4 Days-away-from-work cases include those which result in days away from work
 with or without restricted work
activity.
  5 To maintain historical comparability with the rest of the series, data for 
small nonfarm employers in low-risk
industries who were not surveyed were imputed and included in the survey estima
tes.
  6 Data for 1992-93 exclude fatal work-related injuries and illnesses.
 
  NOTE:  Because of rounding, components may not add to the totals.  Data for 1
976-93 exclude farms with fewer
than 11 employees.
  - Data not available.
 
 Table 5. Occupational injury and illness incidence rates per 100 full-time wor
kers 1, by industry division, 1991-93
_______________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
                               :                        :                      
                           :
                               :                        :                Lost w
orkday cases               :
                               :                        :______________________
___________________________:
                               :                        :                     :
                           :       Cases without
                               :      Total cases       :                     :
      With days away       :       lost workdays
       Industry division       :                        :       Total 2       :
       from work 3         :
                               :________________________:_____________________:
___________________________: ______________________
                               :                        :                     :
                           :
                               :  1991   1992 4  1993 4 : 1991  1992 4  1993 4:
 1991   1992 4    1993 4   :  1991   1992 4  1993 4
_______________________________:________________________:_____________________:
__________________________ :
                               :                        :                     :
                           :
Private industry 5............ :   8.4     8.9     8.5  :  3.9    3.9     3.8 :
   3.2     3.0       2.9   :   4.5     5.0     4.8
                               :                        :                     :
                           :
Agriculture, forestry, and     :                        :                     :
                           :
   fishing 5...................:  10.8    11.6    11.2  :  5.4    5.4     5.0 :
   4.8     4.7       4.2   :   5.3     6.2     6.2
Mining 6.......................:   7.4     7.3     6.8  :  4.5    4.1     3.9 :
   4.0     3.6       3.3   :   2.8     3.3     2.9
Construction...................:  13.0    13.1    12.2  :  6.1    5.8     5.5 :
   5.6     5.3       4.9   :   6.9     7.3     6.7
Manufacturing..................:  12.7    12.5    12.1  :  5.6    5.4     5.3 :
   3.9     3.5       3.3   :   7.1     7.1     6.8
     Durable goods.............:  13.6    13.4    13.1  :  5.7    5.5     5.4 :
   4.0     3.7       3.5   :   7.9     7.9     7.7
     Nondurable goods..........:  11.5    11.3    10.7  :  5.5    5.3     5.0 :
   3.7     3.3       3.0   :   6.0     6.0     5.7
Transportation and public      :                        :                     :
                           :
   utilities 6.................:   9.3     9.1     9.5  :  5.4    5.1     5.4 :
   4.6     4.2       4.3   :   3.9     4.0     4.1
Wholesale and retail trade.....:   7.6     8.4     8.1  :  3.4    3.5     3.4 :
   3.0     2.9       2.8   :   4.1     4.9     4.7
  Wholesale trade..............:   7.2     7.6     7.8  :  3.7    3.6     3.7 :
   3.1     3.0       2.8   :   3.6     3.9     4.1
  Retail trade.................:   7.7     8.7     8.2  :  3.3    3.4     3.3 :
   2.9     2.9       2.7   :   4.4     5.3     4.9
Finance, insurance, and real   :                        :                     :
                           :
    estate.....................:   2.4     2.9     2.9  :  1.1    1.2     1.2 :
   1.0     1.0       1.0   :   1.3     1.7     1.7
Services.......................:   6.2     7.1     6.7  :  2.8    3.0     2.8 :
   2.5     2.5       2.3   :   3.3     4.2     3.9
_______________________________:________________________:_____________________:
___________________________:_______________________
 
    1 The incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 10
0 full-time workers and were calculated as:
(N/EH) x 200,000, where
 
               N       = number of injuries and illnesses
               EH      = total hours worked by all employees during the calenda
r year
               200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 
hours per week,
                         50 weeks per year).
 
    2 Total includes cases involving restricted work activity only
in addition to days-away-from-work cases with or without restricted work activi
ty.
    3 Days-away-from-work cases include those which result in days away from wo
rk with or without restricted work activity.
    4 Data for 1992-93 exclude fatal work-related injuries and illnesses.
    5 Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
    6 Data conforming to OSHA definitions for mining operators in coal, metal, 
and nonmetal mining and for employers in
railroad transportation are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Admin
istration, U.S. Department of Labor; and
the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.  Indepe
ndent mining contractors are excluded
from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries.
    NOTE:  Because of rounding, components may not add to the totals.
Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time worke
rs (1), by industry, 1993
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
                                                                               
          Lost workday cases
                                                              Annual           
      __________________________
                                                 SIC         average       Tota
l                                Cases without
               Industry (2)                    code (3)     employment     case
s                                lost workdays
                                                               (4)             
                        With
                                                             (000's)           
        Total (5)    days away
                                                                               
                   from work (6)
_______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________
 
     Private industry (7)..................                  91,932.1        7.
9           3.5          2.7           4.4
 
  Agriculture, forestry, and fishing (7)...                   1,224.4       10.
6           4.8          4.1           5.8
 
  Agricultural production (7)..............     01-02          n.a.         10.
9           5.1          4.2           5.8
    Agricultural production-crops (7)......       01           n.a.         10.
4           4.9          4.0           5.6
    Agricultural production-livestock (7)..       02           n.a.         12.
4           5.9          5.0           6.5
    Agricultural services..................       07           n.a.         10.
5           4.6          4.0           5.9
    Forestry...............................       08           n.a.          9.
1           4.4          3.6           4.7
    Fishing, hunting, and trapping.........       09           n.a.          7.
4           4.0          3.6           3.3
 
  Mining (8)...............................                     599.0        6.
5           3.8          3.2           2.7
 
    Metal mining (8).......................       10             50.6        5.
6           3.1          2.3           2.5
    Coal mining (8)........................       12            105.3        9.
6           7.4          7.1           2.2
    Oil and gas extraction ................       13            343.4        5.
9           2.9          2.4           2.9
    Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels (8).       14             99.8        6.
1           3.7          2.9           2.5
 
  Construction.............................                   4,574.0       12.
0           5.4          4.8           6.6
 
    General building contractors...........       15          1,060.9       11.
3           5.0          4.5           6.2
    Heavy construction, except building....       16            708.5       10.
9           5.0          4.3           5.8
    Special trade contractors..............       17          2,804.4       12.
6           5.7          5.1           6.9
 
  Manufacturing............................                  17,802.0       10.
4           4.6          2.9           5.9
 
  Durable goods............................                  10,047.0       11.
4           4.8          3.1           6.6
 
    Lumber and wood products...............       24            685.5       15.
2           7.3          5.6           7.9
    Furniture and fixtures.................       25            480.5       13.
2           5.8          3.7           7.5
    Stone, clay, and glass products........       32            512.2       13.
0           5.9          4.1           7.0
    Primary metal industries...............       33            676.1       15.
6           6.9          4.5           8.7
    Fabricated metal products..............       34          1,311.2       14.
8           6.2          4.1           8.6
    Industrial machinery and equipment.....       35          1,899.5       10.
1           3.8          2.6           6.4
    Electronic and other electric equipment       36          1,513.3        6.
8           2.8          1.8           4.0
    Transportation equipment...............       37          1,726.7       14.
3           5.8          3.2           8.5
    Instruments and related products.......       38            880.8        4.
3           1.9          1.2           2.5
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
See footnotes at end of table.
 Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time work
ers (1), by industry, 1993 - Continued
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
                                                                               
         Lost workday cases
                                                              Annual           
     __________________________
                                                 SIC         average      Total
                                Cases without
               Industry (2)                    code (3)     employment    cases
                                lost workdays
                                                               (4)             
                       With
                                                             (000's)           
       Total (5)    days away
                                                                               
                  from work (6)
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
 
 
    Miscellaneous manufacturing industries.       39            361.6       8.7
           3.9          2.6           4.8
 
  Nondurable goods.........................                   7,755.0       9.1
           4.3          2.7           4.8
 
    Food and kindred products..............       20          1,650.1      14.2
           7.1          4.3           7.0
    Tobacco products.......................       21             46.8       5.4
           2.3          1.7           3.1
    Textile mill products..................       22            666.2       8.3
           3.7          1.8           4.7
    Apparel and other textile products.....       23            977.2       7.0
           2.9          2.1           4.1
    Paper and allied products..............       26            680.2       9.1
           4.3          2.6           4.8
    Printing and publishing................       27          1,504.2       6.2
           2.8          2.1           3.4
    Chemicals and allied products..........       28          1,073.6       5.2
           2.4          1.4           2.8
    Petroleum and coal products............       29            155.3       4.9
           2.3          1.4           2.5
    Rubber and miscellaneous plastics
   products................................       30            885.8      12.6
           5.8          3.6           6.7
    Leather and leather products...........       31            115.8       9.6
           4.3          3.0           5.3
 
  Transportation and public utilities (8)..                   5,708.0       9.1
           5.2          4.1           3.9
 
    Railroad transportation (8)............       40            250.1       5.6
           4.3          3.7           1.3
    Local and interurban passenger transit.       41            366.7      11.1
           5.5          4.9           5.6
    Trucking and warehousing...............       42          1,629.1      13.5
           8.1          6.5           5.4
    Water transportation...................       44            166.7      10.0
           5.5          5.2           4.5
    Transportation by air..................       45            733.2      14.6
           8.1          6.8           6.5
    Pipelines, except natural gas..........       46             17.7       3.6
           1.9          1.3           1.7
    Transportation services................       47            347.3       3.9
           2.0          1.7           1.8
    Communications.........................       48          1,252.0       3.4
           1.8          1.4           1.6
    Electric, gas, and sanitary services...       49            945.2       7.0
           3.6          2.2           3.4
 
  Wholesale and retail trade...............                  25,856.0       7.9
           3.3          2.7           4.5
 
  Wholesale trade..........................                   6,113.0       7.5
           3.6          2.7           3.9
 
    Wholesale trade--durable goods.........       50          3,492.0       6.6
           2.9          2.2           3.7
    Wholesale trade--nondurable goods......       51          2,622.0       8.8
           4.6          3.5           4.3?_____________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
________
See footnotes at end of table.
 Table 6.   Nonfatal occupational injury incidence rates per 100 full-time work
ers (1), by industry, 1993 - Continued
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________
                                                                               
         Lost workday cases
                                                             Annual            
     __________________________
                                                 SIC        average       Total
                                Cases without
               Industry (2)                    code (3)    employment     cases
                                lost workdays
                                                              (4)              
                       With
                                                            (000's)            
       Total (5)    days away
                                                                               
                  from work (6)
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
 
 
 
  Retail trade.............................                 19,743.0        8.0
           3.2          2.7           4.8
 
    Building materials and garden supplies.       52           789.9       10.6
           4.9          3.9           5.7
    General merchandise stores.............       53         2,371.1       10.3
           4.8          3.5           5.4
    Food stores............................       54         3,210.4       10.3
           4.2          3.7           6.0
    Automotive dealers and service stations       55         2,034.9        7.7
           2.8          2.5           4.9
    Apparel and accessory stores...........       56         1,141.1        3.9
           1.6          1.3           2.3
    Furniture and homefurnishings stores...       57           842.7        5.3
           2.6          2.1           2.7
    Eating and drinking places.............       58         6,863.4        8.3
           2.9          2.5           5.4
    Miscellaneous retail...................       59         2,489.7        4.4
           2.0          1.6           2.4
 
  Finance, insurance, and real estate......                  6,604.0        2.5
           1.0          0.9           1.5
 
    Depository institutions................       60         2,115.1        2.1
           0.7          0.6           1.4
    Nondepository institutions.............       61           409.7        1.1
           0.4          0.3           0.6
    Security and commodity brokers.........       62           462.7        0.8
           0.3          0.3           0.5
    Insurance carriers.....................       63         1,464.7        1.8
           0.7          0.6           1.1
    Insurance agents, brokers, and service.       64           646.6        1.3
           0.4          0.4           0.9
    Real estate............................       65         1,280.0        6.0
           2.8          2.4           3.2
    Holding and other investment offices...       67           225.1        2.2
           0.9          0.7           1.4
 
  Services.................................                 29,543.7        6.4
           2.7          2.2           3.7
 
    Hotels and other lodging places........       70         1,577.4       10.4
           4.7          3.7           5.7
    Personal services......................       72         1,108.5        4.0
           1.9          1.5           2.1
    Business services......................       73         5,749.3        4.7
           2.2          1.9           2.5
    Auto repair, services, and parking.....       75           927.3        7.3
           3.0          2.6           4.3
    Miscellaneous repair services..........       76           355.2        8.1
           3.6          3.0           4.5
    Motion pictures........................       78           420.8        3.2
           1.0          0.8           2.1
    Amusement and recreation services......       79         1,181.6       10.0
           3.9          3.0           6.0
    Health services........................       80         8,870.8        9.1
           3.7          3.1           5.4
    Legal services.........................       81           929.7        1.0
           0.4          0.3           0.7
    Educational services...................       82         1,746.5        4.2
           1.4          1.2           2.7
    Social services........................       83         2,068.3        7.1
           3.2          2.7           3.8
    Museums, botanical, zoological gardens.       84            76.0        8.5
           3.5          2.6           5.0
    Engineering and management services....       87         2,522.0        2.4
           1.0          0.8           1.4
    Services, n.e.c........................       89            41.8        2.2
           0.9          0.7           1.3
_______________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________
 
  1 The incidence rates represent the number of injuries per 100 full-time work
ers and were calculated as:  (N/EH) X 200,000,
where
 
     N           =  number of injuries
     EH          =  total hours worked by all employees during the calendar yea
r
     200,000  =  base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours pe
r week, 50 weeks per year).
 
  2 Totals for divisions include data for industries not shown separately.
  3 Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987 Edition.
  4 Employment is expressed as an annual average and is derived primarily from 
the BLS-State Current Employment Statistics
program.  Annual average employment for the agriculture, forestry, and fishing 
division is a composite of employment data
for agricultural production (SIC's 01 and 02) as obtained from the Annual Surve
y of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and
employment data for agricultural services (SIC 07); forestry (SIC 08); and fish
ing, hunting, and trapping (SIC 09) as obtained
from the State unemployment insurance programs.
  5 Total includes cases involving restricted work activity only in addition to
 days-away-from-work cases with or without
restricted work activity.
  6 Days-away-from-work cases include those which result in days away from work
 with or without restricted work activity.
  7 Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
  8 Data conforming to OSHA definitions for mining operators  in coal, metal, a
nd nonmetal mining and for employers in
railroad transportation are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Admin
istration, U.S. Department of Labor; and
the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. Indepen
dent mining contractors are excluded from the
coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries.
 
   NOTE:  Because of rounding, components may not add to the totals.
n.a. = data not available.  n.e.c. = not elsewhere classified.
 
 Table 7.  Nonfatal occupational injuries:  number of cases and incidence rates
,
per 100 full-time workers 1, for industries with 100,000 or more injury cases,
1993?                                               Total
      Industry                    SIC          cases         Incidence
                                 code 2       (000's)           rate
_______________________________________________________________________________
_
 
Eating and drinking places....    581           382.5            8.3
 
Hospitals.....................    806           331.7           10.9
 
Grocery stores................    541           230.8           11.0
 
Nursing and personal care
 facilities...................    805           216.4           16.9
 
Trucking and courier
 services, except air.........    421           209.3           13.7
 
Department stores.............    531           164.3           10.6
 
Motor vehicles and equipment
 manufacturing................    371           149.4           17.7
 
Hotels and motels.............    701           129.5           10.5
 
Groceries and related
 products--wholesale..........    514           100.1           12.1
_____________________________________________________________________________
 
     1  Incidence rates represent the number of injuries per 100 full-time
   workers and were calculated as:  (N/EH) X 200,000 where,
 
    N       = number of injuries,
    EH      = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year,
    200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per
              week, 50 weeks per year).
 
     2  Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987 Edition.