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December 19, 2002

Stimulate the Economy- Bail out States

This coming year could witness a ludicrous budgetary dance.

In the name of stimulating the economy, the federal government will likely cut taxes to the tune of tens of billions of dollars.

In the name of balancing their budgets, state governments will likely raise taxes to the tune of tens of billions of dollars.

Hmmm...wouldn't a little sanity call for some large-scale help for state budgets from the feds, rather than dancing this silly tax two-step.

California is only the most dramatic case of state budget meltdown. You can check out this report from the National Governors Association for a broader survey on their dire straits.

Posted by Nathan at December 19, 2002 08:56 AM

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Comments

One of the interesting side effects of this is that if the federal government funds the states, the fed will be able to force the states to adopt uniform standards for homosexual marriages, gun control, welfare, affirmative action and so forth. Most excellent!

Then, thinking further, why have states at all in that case? Why not just one large federal government, with, say, regional governers? We can get rid of the Senate and the House, directly electing a President from the popular vote, and let him (or her) appoint the rest of the government. This would ensure that the mandate of the president wasn't compromised, and give us fast track ability to pass legislation, without all that pointless debate in the Senate. Everything would be consistent, across the country - everyone would be treated the same, no one would have extra power or influence over the government (since it is just one, super-powerful individual in control).

Ruthlessly efficient, unwavering in authority, directly elected by the populace. Now that's a government worth dying over.

Posted by: jb at December 20, 2002 02:21 PM

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